and They are the protagonists of a story that becomes the chronicle of the lack of strategic vision. For a few months now, Gareca has appeared in the bank’s campaign, wallpapering the city with his face associated with security and trust. Two key words, in a financial territory, where trust is an almost impossible mission.

The environment at that moment featured a Juan Reynoso (Peru coach at that time) who, literally, could not get his foot in the door, while Gareca It reached 90% approval in the minds and hearts of Peruvians. What was the risk for Scotiabank, then? Apparently none. That, if you see it as a very short-term tactical strategy, something it evidently was not.

Ricardo Gareca was presented as Chile’s new coach. (Photo: Agencies)

Bet for Lying on a recognized person always has more disadvantages than advantages. It’s a strategy called ‘Celebrity Endorsement’. From my perspective, it is only useful when it is a new brand that needs to quickly endorse obvious values ​​that a person has already built, such as, for example, love for Peru, taste for music, youth, freshness. In all other cases, the risk is immense.

First, because the brand depends on professional behavior but, above all, personal of the chosen celebrity. Second, because the person’s fame can be so great that it opaque that of the brand. In that case, you end up remembering the celebrity more than the brand. Third, because In a world full of brands that use famous people, creativity is no longer impressive. AND It has not only happened in Peru, our wonderland, where anything can happen. Let’s remember Tiger Woods removed from all brand representation after being found cheating on his wife. Charlie Sheen, who arrived in dire condition to film “Two and a Half Men” and was eliminated from the series after a brawl with the producer. That fight earned him representation from several brands as well.

The message of "think" that he left to those he directed and was immortalized.  (Photo: Agencies)

The “think” message that he left to those he directed was immortalized. (Photo: Agencies)

Although this is not the case of Ricardo Gareca, because when it is decided to put a famous person as the face of a brand, scenarios must also be considered. It was known that the coach was about to relocate, flirting with several countries that wanted to have him in charge of their teams. It was known that he would not return to Peru. It was known that there had already been several truncated negotiations, which closed the range of options. It was not at all unreasonable to propose a scenario in which he would end up directing the Chilean team. Just as it happened.

“It was known that the coach was about to relocate, flirting with several countries that wanted to have him in charge of their teams. It was known that he would not return to Peru.”

Until yesterday, Ricardo Garecahe , was the brand image of the Peruvian branch of Scotiabank, in its ‘branding’ campaign. What a bummer, where the only thing left was to react quickly and turn the play around. Defenders of the idea speak of courage, of daring, of betting. All of that sounds very good, but I sincerely believe that being brave and betting goes hand in hand with a broad and deep strategic vision., that accompanies a highly creative campaign, which is not the case.

Now, brands are human from the reality of being managed by human beings with successes and errors. Speed ​​of response at this time is essential. I don’t think anyone questions Gareca’s human quality, nor the extraordinary coach he was for the Peruvian team. What I question is the choice of him as a brand image at a time of professional and personal transition. He is free to choose to be director of Chile, with the antibodies that this implies and taking on the largest fans in the world against him. But in the same way, Scotiabank has the freedom to choose if it wants to continue being linked to it after this decision.

Let’s think. Who wins, who loses in this equation? The referee is about to give a card, we will have to see which bank.



Source link

Leave a Comment

Comments

No comments yet. Why don’t you start the discussion?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *